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Could an NBA Lockout be a Blessing in Disguise for the Lakers? Reviewed by Momizat on . Basketball fans are surely in a dour mood today. The announcement that the NBA lockout was officially upon us was decidedly unsurprising and yet no less depress Basketball fans are surely in a dour mood today. The announcement that the NBA lockout was officially upon us was decidedly unsurprising and yet no less depress Rating:
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Could an NBA Lockout be a Blessing in Disguise for the Lakers?

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Basketball fans are surely in a dour mood today. The announcement that the NBA lockout was officially upon us was decidedly unsurprising and yet no less depressing for the extended notice. I’d wager to say that I’m not alone in holding a bleak outlook for the prospects of an agreement being in place before the scheduled start of the season. Both sides are digging in hard and there is little impetus to negotiate further, at least on the owners side, until the ramifications of the work stoppage hit home (see: missed paychecks). But for the Los Angeles Lakers maybe a shortened 2012 campaign wouldn’t be the worst thing in the world. Yeah, you’re skeptical, but hear me out.

L.A. ended the 2011 season on a bitter note. They looked tired, uninspired and a basically a shadow of the team that displayed poise and grit in winning back to back championships the previous two years. But if it was fatigue, both mental and physical, that did them in then wouldn’t a prolonged absence actually serve them well in hopes of returning to the promised land?

In the lockout shortened season of  1998-’99 there were only fifty games on the schedule. There was a three game preseason, no All-Star game and the Spurs won a championship that Phil Jackson later qualified as needing an ‘asterisk’ in the record books. But what would a fifty game schedule mean to the 2012 Lakers? Consider a few key facts about this squad (assuming of course that there are no major alterations once the lockout finally ends).

Next Page: So You’re Saying the Lockout is a Good Thing?

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About The Author

Brian is Director of Business Development for LakersNation.com and the creator of TouchdownLA. You can follow Brian on Twitter @bchampla.

Number of Entries : 70
  • TheNolanater

    The lockout will most def help the Lakers if less of a season it give Kobe some more well needed time off to get 100% cause of his many injuries that he always plays through cause he’s a freak of nature but with more time off give Kobe time to heal get 100%
    Kobe is a freak of nature fighting through his fingers injuries his knee injury his ankle injury his shoulder injury he played through. Now picture Kobe at 100% which the longer the lockout the more it makes that possible
    For all Laker fans it will suck not seeing the Lakers play on time but the longer they don’t really it’s a blessing in disguise.

  • http://www.facebook.com/charles.colemon Charles Colemon

    The Lakers will have a completely new coaching staff, new players, new offense, new defense…I’d think they need all the floor time they could possibly get.  Sure they will be rested but with all the changes, rest will not me the biggest factor.

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